LONG ISLAND CAT KITTEN SOLUTION (LICKS)

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About Spay/Neuter

Why Spay/Neuter?

Besides helping to eliminate the tremendous overpopulation of kittens, many of whom are reduced to living a life of misery and hunger on the streets, spaying or neutering your cat offers several health benefits, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).


  • Female cats will live a longer, healthier life. Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast tumors, which are malignant or cancerous in about 90 percent of cats. Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases.
  • Neutering prevents testicular cancer and some prostate problems in male cats.


Additionally, spaying and neutering can offer behavioral benefits:


  • Your spayed female pet won't go into heat. While cycles can vary, female felines usually go into heat four to five days every three weeks during breeding season. In an effort to advertise for mates, they'll yowl and urinate more frequently.
  • Your neutered male may be better behaved. Unneutered cats are more likely to mark their territory by spraying strong-smelling urine all over the house. Some aggression problems may be avoided by early neutering.

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"The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®) was the first humane society to be established in North America and is, today, one of the largest in the world.  Their organization was founded on the belief that animals are entitled to kind and respectful treatment at the hands of humans and must be protected under the law." © 2019 American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

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When To Spay/Neuter Your Cat

We generally recommend that kittens be spayed or neutered at four months old as they recover more quickly from anesthesia than at a younger age. The cat must weigh at least three pounds. Generally, female cats can go into heat as young as five months. It’s possible to spay a female cat while she’s in heat.


 

What Happens If You Don't Choose Spay/Neuter?


If you’re under the impression keeping your cat intact is the kinder choice, you’re dooming your cat to a life of frustration and being at the mercy of his or her hormones. Intact male cats will spray inside your home, leaving a foul smelling odor on your floors, furniture and belongings. They will become aggressive and act out, whether it's physically towards you and your family or on your furniture; either way destruction is inevitable. Both male and female cats will be on a mission to roam and will likely result in your cat escaping the home to seek out a mate. Once your cat escapes, it will likely procreate and can even end up in a dangerous territory dispute with other hormonal cats that can result in injury, or even worse, a fatality.


The decision to spay or neuter your cat will be one of the best decisions you make regarding your cat’s health and welfare and will not only benefit your cat, but it will benefit you too.

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